Sociology Courses

Department of Sociology Courses (2015-2016)

SOC 1000The Sociological Perspective (3).F;S. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Liberal Studies Experience This course applies the sociological perspective to the experience of individuals within differing social contexts, ranging from interpersonal interactions and small groups to larger organizations and the broader society. Relationships between individuals and their societies are examined with respect to a variety of issues, including socialization processes and cultural diversity; the nature of gender, racial, and other social identities; and institutional settings ranging from the family to the economy and government. Required for majors and minors.

SOC 1100Social Problems in American Society (3).F;S. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Integrative Learning Experience (Theme: "Revolutions: Social and Political") A survey course which examines the major social problems in America today, such as poverty, racism, sexism, aging, militarism and war, environmental abuse, crime, mental illness, drug abuse and alcoholism.

SOC 1110Sociology of Intimate Relationships (3).F;S. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Integrative Learning Experience (Theme: "Social Relations Across Contexts") Sociological perspectives and knowledge concerning intimate relationships, marriage, and family life in American society. General topics include marriage and marital relations; the family as a social institution; intimacy and love; sex, sexuality, and sexual relations; gender relations; singlehood; family dynamics; parenthood and child rearing; family crisis, conflict, and change; and marital separation, divorce, and remarriage.

SOC 1530–1531Selected Topics (1–4). On Demand. This course cannot be applied to the sociology major or minor or applied to general education requirements.

SOC 2020Social Deviance (3).F;S. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Liberal Studies Experience This course explores the social construction of deviance and the social causes of and explanations for deviant behavior. The course emphasizes theoretical explanations of social deviation illustrated with substantive examples as they occur in a social context.

SOC 2040. Popular Culture (3).S. Alternate years. Examines the nature and use of popular culture, and the popular forms of everyday life in America, including popular beliefs, popular images of objects and people, popular events and rituals, and the popular arts. Among topics considered are soap operas, sports, rock and popular music, movies, plays, art, comics, fashions, popular literature, and other forms of mass-mediated culture.

SOC 2050. Social Diversity and Inequalities (3).S. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Integrative Learning Experience (Theme: "Intersections: Race, Class, and Gender") This course utilizes intersectionality as a conceptual anchor to examine the social diversity, inequality, and power differentials that exist with the United States and abroad. Among the topics covered are how such social identities of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality, religion, nationality, region, and other social statuses are related to social stratification, intergroup relations, and other social patterns. Discussion centers on how these socially-constructed statuses provide rationales for privilege and oppression and their relationship to the structural distribution of power and control across contexts. SOC 2060. Religion and Society (3).F. Alternate years. A general introduction to a sociological perspective on religion. Examines the social meaning and consequences of religion in both its religious and secular roles in modern society.

SOC 2500. Independent Study (1–4).F;S. SOC 2700. Sociology of Sport (3).S. This course examines the social significance of sport. Attention will focus on sport as an institution, social process, and its relation to Sociology social organization, race, gender, class, and major institutions such as family, education, mass media, government and economics. Students will be provided with an understanding of the impact of sport on culture and vice versa.

SOC 2850. Constructions of Gender (3).F;S. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Liberal Studies Experience Sociological introduction to the effects of gender on social relations and contemporary social issues. Major topics include socialization, women as a minority group, work and family, interpersonal power, and law. Historical and cross-cultural analyses also are included. Other topics may be added at the request of the student or the initiative of the instructor.

SOC 3100. Gerontology (3).F;S. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Liberal Studies Experience This course will provide a broad overview of the physical, psychological, social, and cultural aspects of aging. Major concepts, issues, and current research on aging will be analyzed, and current and proposed federal, state, and local programs impinging on the aged will be examined.

SOC 3320. Sociology of Conflict Resolution (3).F. Social conflict is an everyday experience for most people. How we deal with conflict often determines our life outcomes. This class investigates the causes of conflict, the conditions under which conflict leads to violence and the techniques of conflict resolution on both societal and interpersonal levels. This course is designed to help students put sociological theory to practical use.

SOC 3340. Criminology (3).F;S. Study of origins and purposes of criminal law; survey of the various theoretical approaches to the study of crime causation; examination of various categories of criminal behavior including violent crime, occupational crime, political crime, criminal sexuality; and an overview of the criminal justice system which seeks to deter, convict and punish offenders.

SOC 3350. Corrections (3).F;S. A study of the history and development of the adult correctional system as part of the larger adult criminal justice system. Includes overview of the criminal justice system, a review and analysis of theories of punishment, a study of institutional treatment in a total institution and the roles of inmates and staff, and a study of alternatives to incarceration such as parole and probation. Prerequisite: SOC 3340 or SOC 3360 or permission of the instructor.

SOC 3360. Juvenile Delinquency (3).S. A study of the history and development of the juvenile correctional system as part of the larger juvenile justice system. Includes definitions of delinquency, a survey of various theoretical approaches to delinquency causation and punishment, a comparison of the juvenile and adult systems of correction and an overview of the special problems of juvenile offenders.

SOC 3370. Sexual Deviance and Violence (3).S. Examines the cultural and historical contexts of sexual attitudes and behavior, the definition of deviance, theories of deviance, and specific forms of sexually deviant behavior. Treatment strategies are considered.

SOC 3500. Independent Study (1–4).F;S. SOC 3520. Instructional Assistance (1).F;S. A supervised experience in the instructional process on the university level through direct participation in a classroom situation. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.

SOC 3530–3549. Selected Topics (1–4). On Demand. An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided for in the sociology curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate. SOC 3550. Sociology of Work and Organizations (3).F. An examination of the social context of work and related organizations, including issues pertaining to job satisfaction, organizational structure and dynamics, managerial strategies and leadership, and the nature of occupations and professions. The impact of contemporary social transformations such as labor force diversity, technological development, and economic globalization are also analyzed.

SOC 3600. Medical Sociology (3).F. A study of health care, medical settings, and the medical professions. Includes the creation and epidemiology of disease and illness, the structure of the health care industry, doctor-patient interaction, and major health care problems.

SOC 3710. Sociology of Appalachian Communities (3).S. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Integrative Learning Experience (Theme: "Appalachian Mountains: Community, Culture, and Land") This course examines Appalachian communities from the sociological perspective, with a focus on how the region gives rise to a unique configuration of cultural, institutional, and other social practices. Specific attention is also given to the differences between urban and rural Appalachian communities, as well as the complex relationships Appalachia has with the broader component of American society.

SOC 3750. Propaganda, Media and Society (3).F. This course will focus on the processes and effects of mass media in the United States from a sociological perspective. It will analyze the effect of the media on human groups and behavior and how media interacts with social organizations such as family, education, and government. The historical development of the media as it relates to socialization patterns and racial and sexual diversity will be explored and the media’s function as a means of propaganda in the U.S. will be analyzed.

SOC 3800. Sociology of War (3).F. GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Integrative Learning Experience (Theme: "War and Peace") A study of the sociological effects of war on individuals, families, and communities. Topics that are covered include military conscription and the draft, the role of minorities in the military, pro-war and anti-war movements, readjustment problems of veterans, war crimes, the portrayal of war in film and music, ethnocentrism and cultural differences, general causes of war and conflict resolution.

SOC 3885. Research Methods I (3).F;S. GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline (WID) Relationship of theory to research; research design, sampling procedures, application of research methodologies. Required of majors. Prerequisites: six semester hours in sociology, including SOC 1000; and RC 2001 or its equivalent.

SOC 3895. Research Methods II (3).F;S. Data preparation and analysis, computer applications, presentation and interpretation of findings. Required of majors. Prerequisite: SOC 3885 or permission of the instructor. (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

SOC 3890. Research Assistance (1). On Demand. Supervised involvement in faculty research project. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours. Graded on an S/U basis. SOC 3895. Research Methods II (3).F;S. Data preparation and analysis, computer applications, presentation and interpretation of findings. Required of majors. Prerequisite: SOC 3885 or permission of the instructor. (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

SOC 3950. Sociological Theory I (3).F;S. This course examines the major theories that have contributed the most to our understanding of social behavior and human relationships. The course covers the early history of sociology. Required of majors. Prerequisite: six semester hours in sociology, including SOC 1000.

SOC 3960. Sociological Theory II (3).F;S. This course examines the major theories that have contributed the most to our understanding of social behavior and human relationships. The course covers contemporary theories and recent trends. Required of majors. Prerequisites: SOC 1000 and SOC 3950.

SOC 4150. Sociology of Law (3).F. This course is an introduction to the sociology of law. The primary focus of this course is the sociological perspective on laws and their application in the modern world. Special emphasis will be placed on the interplay between laws and social institutions and on laws contributing to the distinctive characteristics of the modern world.

SOC 4250. Collective Behavior and Social Change (3).F. Alternate years. A study of the forces that impact upon society and the delivery of services by governments either through revolution or orderly directed change; the study of the strategy, tactics and effects of change and who affects change.

SOC 4340. Punishment in American Society (3).F. This course provides a sociological survey of the relationship between crime and physical punishment in American society. Legal practices, such as capital punishment, as well as extralegal practices, such as lunching, are both addressed. The social influence of factors such as religion, race, sex, and class on punishment practices are also examined. Prerequisite: SOC 3340 or SOC 3350.

SOC 4350. Constructing Bodies and Sexualities (3).F;S. This course examines the social construction of bodies and the way in which those constructions inform our conceptions of sexuality and procreation. In addition, the course examines how research on sexuality and sexual orientation is conducted and the unique ethical concerns and methodological challenges in researching sexuality. Social policies relevant to bodies and sexualities are also covered. Prerequisite: SOC 2850.

SOC 4390. Applied Sociology Seminar (3).F;S. This course is REQUIRED prior to taking SOC 4900 (Internship). Topics include: (1) an introduction to applied sociology, (2) the history, value and rationale of experiential learning, (3) personal values discovery and skills assessment, (4) exploring career options requiring sociological skills, (5) developing job seeking skills and preparing for an internship, (6) learning to turn academic education into job transferable skills, and (7) applying sociological skills in the work environment. Prerequisite: six semester hours in sociology, including SOC 1000.

SOC 4450. Senior Seminar (3).F;S. GEN ED: Capstone Experience Synthesis, application, and evaluation of sociological perspectives to enhance the understanding of sociology, social behavior, and social issues. Consideration of major theoretical and methodological approaches in sociology and application of the sociological imagination, principles, and concepts to everyday life. Emphasis on the development of critical and analytical thinking skills. Required of majors. Prerequisites: SOC 3885, SOC 3895, SOC 3950, and SOC 3960. SOC 4510. Senior Honors Thesis (3).On Demand. Independent study and research. Honors thesis directed by a member of the Department of Sociology. Prerequisites: completion of six semester hours of departmental honors work and permission of the departmental honors coordinator.

SOC 4530-4549. Selected Topics (1-4).On Demand. An opportunity to study a special topic or combination of topics not otherwise provided in the sociology curriculum. May be repeated for credit when content does not duplicate.

SOC 4560. Race and Minority Relations (3).F. GEN ED: Historical and Social Perspective (Theme: "Cultural Diversity") Examination of intergroup relations, including racial, ethnic, and women's issues; the bases of conflict, accommodation, and assimilation; the nature and consequences of prejudice and discrimination; evaluation of proposals for reduction or elimination of prejudice and discrimination. [Dual-listed with SOC 5560.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department. SOC 4600. Political Sociology (3).S.Alternate years. An analysis of the social influences on political behavior, the relationship between political and other institutions, the uses and abuses of political power. [Dual-listed with SOC 5600.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.

SOC 4650. Women in the Justice System (3).S. This course will explore issues related to women in the criminal justice system. It will examine the types of crime committed by women, treatment of women by police, courts, and the correctional system, women's victimization by battering, rape, and harassment, and women in non-traditional criminal justice occupations. [Dual-listed with SOC 5650.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.

SOC 4750. Social Stratification (3).F. A study of the distribution of wealth, power, privilege, and prestige. The course examines conservative, liberal, and radical explanations of human inequality. Cross-cultural and comparative analysis is used to focus on various problems of inequality and their consequences. [Dual-listed with SOC 5750.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.

SOC 4800. Sociology of the Family (3).S. The origin and development of the family as a social institution; the contemporary family in various cultures; the relationship of the family to the economic, political, religious, and educational institutions in American society. Prerequisite (for undergraduates): SOC 1110. [Dual-listed with SOC 5800.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.

SOC 4850. Globalization and Population (3).On Demand. This course examines how worldwide changes have given rise to global organizations, global inequities and some environmental degradation. Special emphasis is placed on how the population dynamics of fertility, mortality and migration underlie many global issues and create new conflicts. [Dual-listed with SOC 5950.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing; juniors may enroll with permission of the department.(Global Learning Opportunity course)

SOC 4900. Internship (3-6).F;S. Supervised placement in a setting which provides an opportunity for students to observe and practice sociological skills. Graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: SOC 4390 and completion of 90 semester hours of coursework, including 18 semester hours of sociology coursework, with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0.